Never Say Die – Say DIY!

1st printed edition of Hard Bones ready to hit the post office!

The work of Hard Bones was not over with writing or editing or re-editing or formatting. Because a book requires readers to reach its fullest expression and because I do not have a publisher, it is up to me to make sure that this project doesn’t die in silence. If you don’t know me, you’d be forgiven for thinking I’m an egomaniac or narcissist obsessed with getting attention in the middle of a pandemic. In the words of more than one shithead I dated in Philly – “What do you think, you’re better than us??” You’d be forgiven, but I might judge you for being so indoctrinated with neoliberal culture that you can’t find value in expression that serves a purpose outside of capitalism – or even in direct opposition to it. You might want to evict the capitalist cop in your brain 😬

Three finger salutes! Block print layer for cover of Hard Bones.

I’m a great writer, but not having a “great career” renders that fact irrelevant. I have an extensive background of activism, organizing, study, writing, volunteering, donating, door-knocking, etc., but these facts are irrelevant because I have never been accepted or employed by the institutional Left (apart from Union organizing, but those jobs were always dead-end/contract) – which means I lack “legitimacy”. According to the meritocratic ideology we are all swimming in, truly smart/driven/talented people naturally rise to the top and are rewarded for their effort. Of course, I reject that notion by rejecting it first in my own mind-body – and then i reject it wholesale for all of you too.

You ever think about how each and every one of us is born with the potential for greatness? I don’t mean money or a career or clout, but the potential for each of us to reach our fullest expression of humanity that brings more love into the world. I think about how quickly life circumstances come in and smash that potential – the structures and inherited trauma of slavery and colonialism playing out, child abuse, economic precarity, untreated mental illness, etc. Meritocracy would have us believe that the ocean of human endeavor is led by the best and brightest, that that liberal-ish homogenous best and brightest will fix the economy or racism or the pandemic. But again, I reject that. Some of the most important thought and strategy comes from the shadows, the underground – the realm of the lumpenproletariat. We just don’t have the platform or opportunity- yet. My work is part of a collective effort to throw off the weight meritocratic ideology so that we can see the reality of our power.

Personally Embarrassed Billionaires buttons: coming soon!

I am making 50 more print copies of Hard Bones available. $20 a copy (includes shipping, which is about $5). If you cannot afford $20 but really want a hard copy, just fill out the form and we’ll work it out. You can sign up here and I’ll message you when they are ready to ship ( payment via Venmo/PayPal/cashapp): https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLSdKyxg52rgAqpELrzztSmBFZuH934aUnPnHP_tjai57IlzcZA/viewform

E-book is still available for purchase: https://www.amazon.com/Hard-Bones-Heather-Squire-ebook/dp/B08QG37PR7

Thailand – US movement solidarity (design by John Connolly for Permanently Embarrassed Billionaires and Southpaw)
Never Say Die – Say DIY!

Down(wardly mobile) and Out(dated assumptions)

Meritocracy is one of the great fictions of late capitalism in the US, a shiny chrome paint job obscuring the gutted interior and rusted out chassis of society. Our collective allegiance to the myth that wealth and power are doled out on the basis of individual merit, rather than inheritance, nepotism, and structural advantages, keeps us grinding away for longer hours and shrinking wages – even as the GDP rises and new billionaires are made. The carrot-and-stick nature of meritocratic ideology rewards winners with wealth, influence, and power, while punishing the losers with diminished opportunities, increased vulnerability to violence, and shorter life expectancies. As the wealth gap increases, our visceral reactions to this polarized binary become more extreme as well. We celebrate and elect people that we perceive to be most qualified because we hold it to be self-evident that the wealth, influence, and power they hold are the result of individual striving – hard work and gumption ftw. At the other end of the binary, we pathologize, criminalize, and actively hate poor people because we are enchanted by the delusion that such social failure could only be the result of an individual making shitty life choices. You cheer breathlessly in the school yard while the bully beats the crap out of the weakling, hoping that your sycophantic applause  will protect you from being the bully’s next victim – after all you are a half inch shorter than the weakling and you have asthma…it’s not your fault, you think. Don’t hate the player, hate the game.

A COMIC ON MERITOCRACY by Don Low
Continue reading “Down(wardly mobile) and Out(dated assumptions)”
Down(wardly mobile) and Out(dated assumptions)

“It’s Not a Crisis, It’s an Opportunity”

Repurposed sign designed by young adult residents of a rapidly gentrifying neighborhood. Philadelphia, PA.

I started the Facebook page Housing Justice Headlines in early 2019 as a way to aggregate and share all of the articles I was reading related to the housing crisis. As a public page, anyone can see what I post, so I expected to eventually get some angry comments about Sharia Law or building walls. I was not surprised then, when I got into a heated discussion with a commenter over a rather boring Newsweek article about AOC’s connecting student debt and low wages to young people’s inability to buy homes. The exchange was silly because most people accept that low wages and lots of debt are in fact barriers to buying a home. But one thing this person wrote really struck me – “It’s not a crisis, it’s an opportunity.” I couldn’t grasp it at first. “How could anyone regard displacement, eviction, and skyrocketing rents as anything other than a crisis with devastating effects on actual humans, families, and communities?” Corporations certainly make those kind of emotion-free calculations all the time, but how could some regular working guy with a cowboy hat celebrate his neighbor’s loss as his own gain? I eventually came across two items that helped me make sense of that comment. Continue reading ““It’s Not a Crisis, It’s an Opportunity””

“It’s Not a Crisis, It’s an Opportunity”