“It’s Not a Crisis, It’s an Opportunity”

Repurposed sign designed by young adult residents of a rapidly gentrifying neighborhood. Philadelphia, PA.

I started the Facebook page Housing Justice Headlines in early 2019 as a way to aggregate and share all of the articles I was reading related to the housing crisis. As a public page, anyone can see what I post, so I expected to eventually get some angry comments about Sharia Law or building walls. I was not surprised then, when I got into a heated discussion with a commenter over a rather boring Newsweek article about AOC’s connecting student debt and low wages to young people’s inability to buy homes. The exchange was silly because most people accept that low wages and lots of debt are in fact barriers to buying a home. But one thing this person wrote really struck me – “It’s not a crisis, it’s an opportunity.” I couldn’t grasp it at first. “How could anyone regard displacement, eviction, and skyrocketing rents as anything other than a crisis with devastating effects on actual humans, families, and communities?” Corporations certainly make those kind of emotion-free calculations all the time, but how could some regular working guy with a cowboy hat celebrate his neighbor’s loss as his own gain? I eventually came across two items that helped me make sense of that comment. Continue reading ““It’s Not a Crisis, It’s an Opportunity””

“It’s Not a Crisis, It’s an Opportunity”

10 Films to Help You Wrap Your Head Around the Housing Crisis

I taught an undergraduate class on the housing crisis for the Fall 2018 semester that met weekly for 2.5 hours. I wanted to spark debate and discussion about segregation, redlining, gentrification, the failure of public housing in the US, etc., but I quickly realized that the readings I had assigned were too dense for a student lacking a background in social science, rendering in-class discussions lifeless right out of the gate. I started researching films to show in class that would reinforce what I thought were some of the most important concepts, as well as drive home the human element of the housing crisis (in particular for the students who had never experienced housing insecurity). We watched several films throughout the semester and they were great tools to help students talk about various facets of the housing crisis in their own words, as well as to interrogate some of their own internalized biases around housing, poverty, and race. Most of these films can be streamed for free, via Kanopy (login using your local public library card), PBS, Vimeo, or YouTube. Do you have a film related to housing justice to suggest? Add it in the comments and include a link if you can. Continue reading “10 Films to Help You Wrap Your Head Around the Housing Crisis”

10 Films to Help You Wrap Your Head Around the Housing Crisis

Imagining Housing Justice Under Late Capitalism

This is the last part of my thesis I’m posting here: the introduction. My purpose is to share some of the thinkers that inspire me as I continue to think and learn about alternatives to the capitalist real estate market. It doesn’t get very deep; I’m not a great theoretician or jargon generator so it’s pretty short compared to the other parts of my thesis. You can find the first two parts here: A BRIEF-ISH HISTORY OF HOUSING POLICY IN THE UNITED STATES and SOCIAL HOUSING IN VIENNA: LESSONS FOR PHILADELPHIA?

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Realizing a Right to Housing in Philadelphia: Towards a Cohesive Strategy

This paper is an intervention into the market-based housing policy status quo in the United States, and the city I call home, Philadelphia. It is also an intervention into the single-issue activism and advocacy that dominates in social movement circles that deal with housing issues. I will argue that current housing policy in the United States is layered upon generations of racialized public policy that has always centered market ideology at the expense of human flourishing, and therefore an ameliorative approach that seeks to tweak current policy will not be able to adequately address either the structural racism built into the US housing market or the gross distributional inequities the market produces. Instead, I will build the case for a transformative approach that not only critiques the status quo, but parts ways with it to create a realm of struggle for an ideological and instrumental right to housing. Continue reading “Imagining Housing Justice Under Late Capitalism”

Imagining Housing Justice Under Late Capitalism

Course Syllabus: Urban Housing in Crisis

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Source: Homeless Shelters as Band-Aids: Housing Is a Human Right (https://classism.org/homeless-shelters-band-aids-housing-human-right/)

This fall I am teaching a 2-credit undergraduate elective in the Geography and Urban Studies department at Temple University about the housing crisis. The class meets weekly for 2.5 hours and is primarily reading and discussion-based. I’m sharing the syllabus below.


COURSE OVERVIEW

Description

This course will look at the roots and drivers of the contemporary housing crisis as it plays out across the urban landscape using a Right to Housing framework. Affordability, segregation and discrimination, homelessness, eviction, homeownership and mortgages, and gentrification/redevelopment will be the main issues around which this course is structured. Students will engage these topics through assigned readings and media presentations, seeking out relevant local news sources, and discussing these topics and sources in class. For the final assignment, students will choose a topic related to the housing crisis and develop a project of their choosing around it.

Course Objectives

  1. Students will have a historical and geographical understanding of the processes segregation and discrimination, homelessness, eviction, homeownership and mortgages, gentrification, and redevelopment.
  2. Students will understand how these processes are connected and be able to use a Right to Housing framework to describe the processes and think critically about possible solutions.
  3. Students will understand how these processes interact in the city of Philadelphia in particular.

Continue reading “Course Syllabus: Urban Housing in Crisis”

Course Syllabus: Urban Housing in Crisis

Social Housing in Vienna: Lessons for Philadelphia?

I traveled to Vienna in July/August 2017 to get a feel for the city and see for myself what Vienna’s social housing looks like on the ground, as well as to learn from the perspective of people living there. Photos from that trip are interspersed throughout this post to give context and help the reader better imagine social housing. There’s also a great exhibit up at the Center for Architecture in NYC through May 19, 2018 called “Social Housing – New European Projects” that I highly recommend for anyone looking for more inspiration and to get an idea about the kinds of problems (poverty, social isolation, aging, etc.) that these social housing projects (in conjunction with social programs) have set out to address. Lastly, as I finished my thesis (of which this post is a part), Dr. Peter Dreier from Occidental College in Los Angeles published a great article called “Why America Needs More Social Housing” in American Prospect. Definitely worth a read for even more of the Vienna social housing context and ideas for why social housing (suited to the geography and social history of a particular city of course) would go a long way towards addressing the housing crisis in a transformative way.

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From the social housing exhibit at the Center for Architecture.

Continue reading “Social Housing in Vienna: Lessons for Philadelphia?”

Social Housing in Vienna: Lessons for Philadelphia?

A Brief-ish History of Housing Policy in the United States

As geographers we are always reminded that our maps are inherently distorted in some way, whether it’s in shape, distance, or size. Mapmakers have the power to decide what gets included and what gets left out order to tell the most compelling and useful story. Tracking the history of housing policy has been the same for me. I tried to keep focused on housing while providing enough context so the reader could connect the dots. My account below is limited and flawed, but constantly growing the more I read and experience. Any constructive comments, book/author suggestions, or refutations of something I got completely wrong are appreciated. I hope my attempt to bring light to some of the existing literature on housing policy inspires you to further explore this history and question some of the truths you hold to be self-evident. Thanks for reading!

We Want Decent Housing. Photo source.Black Panther Party archive.
Source: Black Panther Archives

Continue reading “A Brief-ish History of Housing Policy in the United States”

A Brief-ish History of Housing Policy in the United States

Review: Gentrifier By John Joe Schlichtman, Jason Patch, and Marc Lamont Hill Foreword by Peter Marcuse

Image result for gentrifier book

GENTRIFIER
By John Joe Schlichtman, Jason Patch, and Marc Lamont Hill
Foreword by Peter Marcuse
UTP Insights
University of Toronto Press, Scholarly Publishing Division © 2017
World Rights
256 Pages

If you are reading this review, there is a good chance that you may be a gentrifier. Hopefully it also means that you are curious about your role in the process of gentrification and open to picking apart what exactly is meant when gentrification is used by academics, activists, and policy makers to describe particular types of urban development. If not you will have a bad time. There is much in this book that will be controversial, flying in the face of conventional wisdom and slogans about gentrification, demanding that those of us with some skin in the game depart from the well-worn paths of description and condemnation to demand something bigger: a transformative approach to housing and community development policy (199). Continue reading “Review: Gentrifier By John Joe Schlichtman, Jason Patch, and Marc Lamont Hill Foreword by Peter Marcuse”

Review: Gentrifier By John Joe Schlichtman, Jason Patch, and Marc Lamont Hill Foreword by Peter Marcuse